Archive for May, 2010

MIR and Mobile Developer TV are now HTML5 compliant

May 31, 2010

Mobile Industry Review and Mobile Developer TV are both HTML5 compliant, meaning from now on, you’ll be able to watch any videos we publish on your iPad or iPhone — or any other smartphone with built-in HTML5 video tag support.

Genius, eh?

It’s all thanks to the new beta HTML5 player from the chaps over at Longtailvideo. I’ve been using their player for Mobile Developer TV since launch. The new beta version of their player now works with HTML5, but degrades nicely for those using older browsers. If your browser doesn’t do HTML5, then you’ll get the flash version as normal. But if you view the site with your iPad, you’ll be able to play the videos nicely, instead of seeing that godawful empty space where the flash player should be.

Bring it on.

To celebrate, here’s a few of the recent videos we published on Mobile Developer TV, starting with episode 1 of the Future of Voicemail Series, supported by HulloMail, featuring Olivier Sichel of Sofinnova Partners.

Download M4V Video | Subscribe to Podcast | Embed video

Download M4V Video | Subscribe to Podcast | Embed video

Download M4V Video | Subscribe to Podcast | Embed video

(My Original Blog Post: http://ping.fm/fjZPP)

Future of Voicemail Series: Part 1, Olivier Sichel of Sofinnova

May 31, 2010

The Future of Voicemail

Welcome to the first in the series of videos exploring the Future of Voicemail, supported by visual voicemail experts HulloMail.

I got my first mobile phone in September 1996. I purchased it from a hovel opposite the Virgin Megastore on Oxford Street, London. After I got the handset home, the first thing I did with it was set my voicemail. I’m willing to bet it’s one of the first things you do too, whenever you’ve activated a new phone connection or joined a new company and been assigned a phone. Voicemail is an entirely ubiquitous service, provided free or inclusive for many.

Voicemail sits in the background. The vast majority of users don’t think twice about it. We use the word daily. We receive and send voicemails daily. Yet its one of the most overlooked essential requirements of today’s mobile (and landline) telephone functionality. Ever been annoyed when you’ve tried to leave a voicemail and got a ‘mailbox full’ error? Yeah. Or when you call someone and the line just rings-and-rings because, for whatever reason, voicemail isn’t active? Have you ever been abroad and phoned your friend/partner only to get their voicemail and realise that even though the call didn’t complete, you’ve been charged a pretty penny for the privilege?

And from a commercial viewpoint, what does it take to deliver voicemail services to 20 million customers on a daily basis? Why do we still need voicemail? Is a voicemail box with 10 slots simply ridiculous or a necessary restriction ? And what’s coming next? What innovation should we expect to see in the near term and beyond?

It’s these issues, questions — and more — that I intend exploring with this series.

Our first thought leader is Olivier Sichel, Partner at well-known European Venture Capital firm, Sofinnova Partners. I was particularly interested to see what he’d have to say, given his tremendous fixed and mobile experience. Prior to joining Sofinnova, Olivier was Chariman of Wanadoo, the €6.5 billion internet and directory giant. So he knows a thing or two.

Over to Olivier — here’s the video:

Download M4V Video | Subscribe to Podcast | Embed video

Thank you for taking the time, Olivier!

I hope you enjoyed the first episode! I aim to bring you the next video in the series — Tim Rea of ePlanet Ventures — next week.

HulloMail’s support has enabled me to produce this series and to help toward keeping the lights on here at Mobile Industry Review. Therefore I would very much appreciate it if you’d take the time to familiarise yourself with the company’s services and perhaps download their app and check out their services. Their app available on iPhone, Android and BlackBerry — but it’ll also work on any handset at all.

(My Original Blog Post: http://ping.fm/NEnhm)

Are mobiles killing off our honey bee populations?

May 30, 2010

Some research in India, quoted in today’s Telegraph points out that mobile phone usage prompted a demonstrable decline in the population of a honey bee hive.

Now researchers from Chandigarh’s Punjab University claim they have found the cause which could be the first step in reversing the decline: They have established that radiation from mobile telephones is a key factor in the phenomenon and say that it probably interfering with the bee’s navigation senses.

Not good at all. Would you give up your mobile to save the honey bees?

(My Original Blog Post: http://ping.fm/j1yVL)

Couldn’t take my eyes of the BBC Sport’s Formula1 iPad

May 30, 2010

Watching the Formula1 Turkey coverage this afternoon I was mightily impressed to see Jake Humphrey swanning around with an iPad as his presenter’s weapon. Microphone in one hand, iPad in the other.. Nice! But ever-so distracting for the geek in me. He used the iPad in the brief interview he did with pole positioned Mark Webber. Has this iPad thing been happening all season with Formula1 or is it new? Much better than carrying a clipboard.

Posted via email from MIR Live

(My Original Blog Post: http://ping.fm/9maI6)

Future of Voicemail Series: Part 1, Olivier Sichel of Sofinnova

May 29, 2010

The Future of Voicemail

Welcome to the first in the series of videos exploring the Future of Voicemail, supported by visual voicemail experts HulloMail.

I got my first mobile phone in September 1996. I purchased it from a hovel opposite the Virgin Megastore on Oxford Street, London. After I got the handset home, the first thing I did with it was set my voicemail. I’m willing to bet it’s one of the first things you do too, whenever you’ve activated a new phone connection or joined a new company and been assigned a phone. Voicemail is an entirely ubiquitous service, provided free or inclusive for many.

Voicemail sits in the background. The vast majority of users don’t think twice about it. We use the word daily. We receive and send voicemails daily. Yet its one of the most overlooked essential requirements of today’s mobile (and landline) telephone functionality. Ever been annoyed when you’ve tried to leave a voicemail and got a ‘mailbox full’ error? Yeah. Or when you call someone and the line just rings-and-rings because, for whatever reason, voicemail isn’t active? Have you ever been abroad and phoned your friend/partner only to get their voicemail and realise that even though the call didn’t complete, you’ve been charged a pretty penny for the privilege?

And from a commercial viewpoint, what does it take to deliver voicemail services to 20 million customers on a daily basis? Why do we still need voicemail? Is a voicemail box with 10 slots simply ridiculous or a necessary restriction ? And what’s coming next? What innovation should we expect to see in the near term and beyond?

It’s these issues, questions — and more — that I intend exploring with this series.

Our first thought leader is Olivier Sichel, Partner at well-known European Venture Capital firm, Sofinnova Partners. I was particularly interested to see what he’d have to say, given his tremendous fixed and mobile experience. Prior to joining Sofinnova, Olivier was Chariman of Wanadoo, the €6.5 billion internet and directory giant. So he knows a thing or two.

Over to Olivier — here’s the video:

Thank you for taking the time, Olivier!

I hope you enjoyed the first episode! I aim to bring you the next video in the series — Tim Rea of ePlanet Ventures — next week.

HulloMail’s support has enabled me to produce this series and to help toward keeping the lights on here at Mobile Industry Review. Therefore I would very much appreciate it if you’d take the time to familiarise yourself with the company’s services and perhaps download their app and check out their services. Their app available on iPhone, Android and BlackBerry — but it’ll also work on any handset at all.

(My Original Blog Post: http://ping.fm/d9AAk)

T-Mobile’s HTC Desire Twitter marketing: Naughty and misleading

May 28, 2010

This caught my eye just moments ago from the T-Mobile UK Official Twitter account:

Superb phone for #business: #HTC Desire, unlimited texts, unlimited Calls, unlimited internet for £20 per month: http://bit.ly/d9k021

“Wow!” I thought, “20 quid a month? For a desire? How are they doing that I wondered?”

I clicked through.

Here’s what I saw:

It’s not 20 quid a month. It’s 35/month but there’s a discount for the first 3 months.

This offer itself is perfectly fine.

It is, however, patently RIDICULOUS to advertise the phone at 20/month.

The website even says: £20 a month (24 months) in bright T-Mobile branded purple.

That tells me the offer is £20 per month for 24 months, right?

No.

Because there’s more clarifying text underneath saying “(for the first 3 months, £35 thereafter)”.

Absolutely ridiculous. Completely and utterly ridiculous.

Do they think our heads button up the back?

This demonstrates yet another further erosion of the English language when it comes to mobile operators.

“Unlimited?”

Oh it’s unlimited. Until you hit the limit.

Or it’s ‘fair use’. Until we decide that fair use means a 500mb limit. (I’m looking at you, Vodafone). So you can have unlimited data. On a 500mb limit.

How long before T-Mobile starts running TV adverts for the HTC Desire at ’20 pounds per month’ with a disclaimer saying that 20 pounds actually equals 35 pounds.

They didn’t even say in big letters on the HTC Desire special offer that it’s “20/month 3-month special offer” or anything like that. No. Ridiculous.

(My Original Blog Post: http://ping.fm/EELVo)

T-Mobile’s HTC Desire Twitter marketing: Naughty and misleading

May 28, 2010

This caught my eye just moments ago from the T-Mobile UK Official Twitter account:

Superb phone for #business: #HTC Desire, unlimited texts, unlimited Calls, unlimited internet for £20 per month: http://bit.ly/d9k021

“Wow!” I thought, “20 quid a month? For a desire? How are they doing that I wondered?”

I clicked through.

Here’s what I saw:

It’s not 20 quid a month. It’s 35/month but there’s a discount for the first 3 months.

This offer itself is perfectly fine.

It is, however, patently RIDICULOUS to advertise the phone at 20/month.

The website even says: £20 a month (24 months) in bright T-Mobile branded purple.

That tells me the offer is £20 per month for 24 months, right?

No.

Because there’s more clarifying text underneath saying “(for the first 3 months, £35 thereafter)”.

Absolutely ridiculous. Completely and utterly ridiculous.

Do they think our heads button up the back?

This demonstrates yet another further erosion of the English language when it comes to mobile operators.

“Unlimited?”

Oh it’s unlimited. Until you hit the limit.

Or it’s ‘fair use’. Until we decide that fair use means a 500mb limit. (I’m looking at you, Vodafone). So you can have unlimited data. On a 500mb limit.

How long before T-Mobile starts running TV adverts for the HTC Desire at ’20 pounds per month’ with a disclaimer saying that 20 pounds actually equals 35 pounds.

They didn’t even say in big letters on the HTC Desire special offer that it’s “20/month 3-month special offer” or anything like that. No. Ridiculous.

(My Original Blog Post: http://ping.fm/KwIuZ)

Just paid a tenner for The Times iPad app… (updated)

May 28, 2010

Why did I pay a tenner for The Times iPad app? Well I thought I should try it out and see what it was like. I’ve had a preview of it and it utterly rocked when I saw it. Alas right now all I see when I run the app is a black screen thus. Perhaps it’s because the first edition has not yet hit the digital presses? I think so. It’s only 1am at the moment. I have high hopes for News International although i do think they are faced with a rather difficult task.

That said, paying a tenner for the app is a little annoying. Unless That has bought me access to the site and service for a year. That would be ok. But paying just to have it on my iPad and then not being being able to login on the web… That would be annoying.

We shall see.

Published on my iPad.

Update: Here’s what I saw last night

This morning though, I saw this…

I clicked and got this message. Ah hah. Right. It’s a tenner for the month, roughly. Ok. I’ve paid in advance already by purchasing the app.

I registered and boom, here was the newspaper’s iPad edition:

The limitations became clear pretty quickly. I can’t DO anything with the content. I can’t send a link, tweet a link or talk about it virtually with anyone. For example, this is a pretty shocking piece of news that I wanted to comment upon to my friends.

I do like the fact that the whole thing is downloaded to the device so I don’t need connectivity to browse through. That’s good. I don’t like having to wait for the internet either.

I’m going to see how I get on and I’ll publish my thoughts soon.

(My Original Blog Post: http://ping.fm/i6jn6)

Does a text from your operator constitute legal notification?

May 28, 2010

I just got a text in from Vodafone this morning as described here.

The text came ‘from’ Vodafone — that was the message identifier.

But you and I know that can be spoofed really easily. What would Vodafone do if I sent a text message to 500,000 of their customers saying ‘Good news, international roaming is now inclusive from midnight tonight’ and set the message sender to ‘Vodafone’?

Does a text message update constitute legal delivery of Vodafone’s message? *THEY* know they sent the message. They can trace the delivery through their network. But *I* don’t know whether it’s a genuine message or not. Do I need to wait until written notification arrives? Have I got any recourse with Vodafone if I act upon a message sent supposedly from them but actually from somebody else?

It’s at times like this when you have to think: SMS is pretty rubbish, isn’t it? Why is it ONLY 160 characters? Why hasn’t the industry upgraded the medium somehow to give some kind of certificate of authority, at least so you know that messages from your operator and bank are genuine?

(My Original Blog Post: http://ping.fm/bGZ4v)

Text from Vodafone: “South Africa now included in Vodafone Passport”

May 28, 2010

Good news for those who’re heading out to South Africa (and who’re using Vodafone). The country has been added to Vodafone Passport for the duration of June and July meaning that any calls you make whilst in the country will use your standard price plan minutes with the obligatory 75p call setup charge.

Good news. It’s a heck of a lot better than a few quid a minute anyway!

Here’s the text I just got from them:

Good News South Africa is now included in your Passport price plan for June and July 2010

What about the other operators? What about data? We shall find out!

(My Original Blog Post: http://ping.fm/HWzJj)